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Nat Genet. 2017 Jun;49(6):913-924. doi: 10.1038/ng.3847. Epub 2017 Apr 17.

Contrasting evolutionary genome dynamics between domesticated and wild yeasts.

Author information

1
Université Côte d'Azur, CNRS, INSERM, IRCAN, Nice, France.
2
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK.
3
Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
4
Laboratory of Computational and Quantitative Biology, Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine, UPMC University Paris 06, Sorbonne Universités, CNRS, Paris, France.

Abstract

Structural rearrangements have long been recognized as an important source of genetic variation, with implications in phenotypic diversity and disease, yet their detailed evolutionary dynamics remain elusive. Here we use long-read sequencing to generate end-to-end genome assemblies for 12 strains representing major subpopulations of the partially domesticated yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its wild relative Saccharomyces paradoxus. These population-level high-quality genomes with comprehensive annotation enable precise definition of chromosomal boundaries between cores and subtelomeres and a high-resolution view of evolutionary genome dynamics. In chromosomal cores, S. paradoxus shows faster accumulation of balanced rearrangements (inversions, reciprocal translocations and transpositions), whereas S. cerevisiae accumulates unbalanced rearrangements (novel insertions, deletions and duplications) more rapidly. In subtelomeres, both species show extensive interchromosomal reshuffling, with a higher tempo in S. cerevisiae. Such striking contrasts between wild and domesticated yeasts are likely to reflect the influence of human activities on structural genome evolution.

PMID:
28416820
PMCID:
PMC5446901
DOI:
10.1038/ng.3847
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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