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Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2017 May 28;375(2094). pii: 20150394. doi: 10.1098/rsta.2015.0394.

The fate of water within Earth and super-Earths and implications for plate tectonics.

Author information

1
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.
2
School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 Terrace Mall, Tempe, AZ 84287, USA ltelkins@asu.edu.

Abstract

The Earth is likely to have acquired most of its water during accretion. Internal heat of planetesimals by short-lived radioisotopes would have caused some water loss, but impacts into planetesimals were insufficiently energetic to produce further drying. Water is thought to be critical for the development of plate tectonics, because it lowers viscosities in the asthenosphere, enabling subduction. The following issue persists: if water is necessary for plate tectonics, but subduction itself hydrates the upper mantle, how is the upper mantle initially hydrated? The giant impacts of late accretion created magma lakes and oceans, which degassed during solidification to produce a heavy atmosphere. However, some water would have remained in the mantle, trapped within crystallographic defects in nominally anhydrous minerals. In this paper, we present models demonstrating that processes associated with magma ocean solidification and overturn may segregate sufficient quantities of water within the upper mantle to induce partial melting and produce a damp asthenosphere, thereby facilitating plate tectonics and, in turn, the habitability of Earth-like extrasolar planets.This article is part of the themed issue 'The origin, history and role of water in the evolution of the inner Solar System'.

KEYWORDS:

Magma Ocean; extrasolar planets; planet formation; plate tectonics; super-Earths; water

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