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Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 Aug;25(8):917-923. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.012. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Risk of Parkinson Disease: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: klh0503@gmail.com.
4
School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Liver Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Research Center for Chinese Herbal Medicine and Research Center for Food and Cosmetic Safety, College of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
5
Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: kremer7119@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Increasing evidence has suggested a relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and neurodegenerative disorder, such as Alzheimer disease. The association between PTSD and Parkinson disease (PD), however, remains unclear.

METHOD:

Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 7,280 subjects (1,456 patients aged ≥45 years with PTSD and 5,824 age-/sex-matched individuals without PTSD) were enrolled between 2002 and 2009 and followed to the end of 2011. Subjects who developed PD during the follow-up period were identified.

RESULTS:

An increased risk of developing PD was found in patients with PTSD (Wald χ2 = 12.061, hazard ratio [HR]: 3.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.72-6.96) compared with individuals without PTSD, after adjusting for demographic data and medical and psychiatric comorbidities. The sensitivity tests after excluding the first year observation (Wald χ2 = 7.948, HR: 3.01, 95% CI: 1.40-6.46) and the first 3-year observation (Wald χ2 = 5.099, HR: 3.07, 95% CI: 1.16-8.15) were consistent.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with PTSD had an elevated risk of developing PD in later life. Further studies would be required to clarify the exact pathophysiology between PTSD and PD and to investigate whether the prompt intervention for PTSD may reduce this risk.

KEYWORDS:

PTSD; Parkinson disease; psychological trauma; temporal association

PMID:
28416268
DOI:
10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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