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Nutr Health. 2017 Jun;23(2):103-110. doi: 10.1177/0260106017704796. Epub 2017 Apr 17.

Knowledge of healthy foods does not translate to healthy snack consumption among exercise science undergraduates.

Author information

1
1 Department of Nutrition and Health Care Management, Appalachian State University, USA.
2
2 Department of Biostatistics, East Carolina University, USA.

Abstract

This cross-sectional survey study compared the on- and off-campus snack choices and related correlates of convenience samples of exercise science (ES) ( n = 165, M = 45%, F = 55%) and non-exercise science (NES) ( n =160, M = 43%, F = 57%) undergraduates. The hypothesis posed was that knowledge of healthy foods will not translate to healthier snack consumption by the ES students, and that the snack choices and related correlates of ES and NES students will be similar. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires completed in classrooms (ES sample) and at high-traffic locations on-campus (NES sample). Chi-square and t-test analyses compared ES and NES students on snack correlates. Snacks consumed most often by the ES and NES students on-campus were health bars/squares ( n = 56 vs. n = 48) and savory snacks ( n = 55 vs. n = 71), and off-campus were savory snacks ( n = 60 vs. n = 71) and fruits ( n = 41 vs. n = 34). Over half of both samples believed their snack choices were a mix of unhealthy and healthy. Fruits were considered healthier snacks and chips less healthy by both samples, and fruits were the most often recommended snack. About 20% believed these choices would impact their health unfavorably, and about two thirds self-classified in the action stages for healthy snacking. Since knowledge about healthy food choices did not translate to healthy snack selection, these students would benefit from interventions that teach selection and preparation of healthy snacks on a restricted budget.

KEYWORDS:

Snack selection; exercise science; knowledge translation; snack correlates; transtheoretical model; undergraduates

PMID:
28413923
DOI:
10.1177/0260106017704796
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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