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Biomed Rep. 2017 Apr;6(4):468-474. doi: 10.3892/br.2017.866. Epub 2017 Feb 24.

Nigella sativa seed extract attenuates the fatigue induced by exhaustive swimming in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Iksan-si, Jeollabuk-do 54596, Republic of Korea.
2
Institute of Jinan Red Ginseng, Jinan-eup, Jinan-gun 55442, Republic of Korea.
3
Korea Basic Science Institute Jeonju Center, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 54896, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

In previous studies, Nigella sativa (NS) has been studied due to its various physiological and pharmacological activities. However, evidence on the effects of NS on physical fatigue following exhaustive swimming remains limited. In the present study, the authors evaluated the potential beneficial effects of NS against the fatigue activity following exhaustive swimming. Rats were orally administered with NS extract (2 g/kg/day) for 21 days, and the anti-fatigue effect was assessed by exhaustive swimming exercise. The presented results indicated that pre-treatment of NS extract significantly increased the time to exhaustion. In hemodynamic parameters, NS extract increased blood pO2 and O2sat, but decreased pCO2. For underlying mechanisms, NS extract protected depletion of energy, indicated by increased levels of blood pH, glucose and tissue glycogen contents, and decreased levels of blood lactate, tissue lactic dehydrogenase and creatine kinase, when the NS extract was pre-treated. In addition, the NS extract inhibited oxidative stress following exhaustive swimming, as reflected by the results of increased levels of superoxide dismutase and redox ratio, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde when the NS extract was pre-treated. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that NS extract has an anti-fatigue activity against exhaustive swimming by energy restoration and oxidative-stress defense.

KEYWORDS:

Nigella sativa; energy depletion; exhaustive swimming; fatigue; oxidative stress

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