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Psychiatry Res. 2017 Jul;253:267-269. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.04.011. Epub 2017 Apr 5.

Frequency of non-right-handedness in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Program for Neuropsychiatric Research, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, USA; Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: cravichandran@mclean.harvard.edu.
2
Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA, USA; Psychotic Disorders Division, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, USA.
3
Program for Neuropsychiatric Research, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA, USA; Psychotic Disorders Division, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, USA.
4
Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA, USA; Center for Experimental Drugs and Diagnostics, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Increased non-right-handedness (NRH) probably reflects neurodevelopmental abnormalities in psychiatric disorders. Past studies of NRH have focused more on schizophrenia (SZ) than bipolar disorder (BPD). We report results on NRH in two large studies. In (1), NRH was compared among BPD patients with psychosis, SZ patients, and healthy controls (HC). NRH was elevated in BPD with psychosis and SZ patients relative to HC, but not SZ relative to BPD. In (2), NRH was compared between BPD patients with and without psychosis. NRH was similarly elevated in both. The findings suggest that NRH may reflect shared brain anomalies in SZ and BPD.

KEYWORDS:

Lateralization; Neurodevelopment; Psychosis

PMID:
28411573
PMCID:
PMC5510165
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.04.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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