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J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2017 Jun;34:58-64. doi: 10.1016/j.jelekin.2017.04.001. Epub 2017 Apr 7.

The effect of age and knee osteoarthritis on muscle activation patterns and knee joint biomechanics during dual belt treadmill gait.

Author information

1
School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; School of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: djr@dal.ca.
2
School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: mdbaker@dal.ca.
3
Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: iw@drivanwong.com.
4
Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: wstanish@stanishortho.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare a group of individuals with moderate medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) to both an age-matched asymptomatic group of older adults and younger adults to determine whether differences in knee joint muscle activation patterns and joint biomechanics exist during gait between these three groups.

SCOPE:

20 young adults, 20 older adults, and 40 individuals with moderate knee OA were recruited. Using standardized procedures, surface electromyograms were recorded from the vastus lateralis and medialis, rectus femoris and the medial and lateral hamstrings. All individuals walked on a dual belt instrumented treadmill while segment motions and ground reaction forces were recorded. Sagittal plane motion and net external sagittal and frontal plane moments were calculated. Discrete measures and principal component analyses extracted amplitude and temporal waveform features. Analysis of Variance models using Bonferroni corrections determined between and within group differences in these gait features (α=0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Individuals with knee OA have distinct biomechanics and muscle activation patterns when compared to age-matched asymptomatic adults and younger adults whereas differences between the young and older adults were few and included only measures of muscle activation amplitude.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Electromyography; Gait analysis; Knee biomechanics; Knee osteoarthritis; Older adults; Principal component analysis; Young adults

PMID:
28411486
DOI:
10.1016/j.jelekin.2017.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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