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J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2018 Feb;5(1):62-72. doi: 10.1007/s40615-017-0342-4. Epub 2017 Apr 14.

A Restorative Yoga Intervention for African-American Breast Cancer Survivors: a Pilot Study.

Author information

1
College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA. t_r_taylor@howard.edu.
2
Community Outreach Associates, P.O. Box 9379, Washington, DC, 20005, USA.
3
Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Biomathematics, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA.
4
Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Research Building, E501, 3970 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC, 20057, USA.
5
Department of Psychology, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA.
6
College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Data show that yoga is effective for improving health-related outcomes in breast cancer survivors. While breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among African-American women (AAW), AAW are less likely to engage in yoga compared to other ethnic groups. The goals of the current study were to assess the feasibility of an 8-week restorative yoga program among African-American breast cancer survivors (AA BCS). Specifically, study aims were to (1) measure changes in study outcomes in a restorative yoga (RY) group compared to a wait list control group, (2) assess adherence to the RY program, and (3) assess program satisfaction among study participants.

METHODS:

Thirty-three AA BCS were randomly assigned to either the RY intervention (n = 18) or wait list control group (n = 15). RY classes met once per week for 8 weeks. Pre- and post-testing assessments were measured at 0 and 8 weeks (immediately post-intervention).

RESULTS:

Depression scores at follow-up were significantly lower in the yoga group (M = 4.78, SD = 3.56) compared to the control group (M = 6.91, SD = 5.86). No significant group differences were observed for sleep quality, fatigue, or perceived stress. Yoga program participants completing baseline assessments demonstrated 61% adherence to the yoga classes. Average rating of the yoga program was "very useful." Recommendations for future yoga programs were provided.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that yoga has a beneficial effect on depression in AA BCS. There is, however, a need to further explore the benefits of yoga among minority breast cancer survivors using a study with larger sample sizes.

KEYWORDS:

African-American; Breast cancer survivors; Yoga

PMID:
28411330
DOI:
10.1007/s40615-017-0342-4

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