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Neurotoxicology. 2017 Jul;61:266-289. doi: 10.1016/j.neuro.2017.04.002. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

Determinants of neurological disease: Synthesis of systematic reviews.

Author information

1
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; Risk Sciences International, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: dkrewski@uottawa.ca.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada.
3
School of Pharmacy, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Science Centre, St. John's, NL, Canada.
4
Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Canada; Health Care and Outcomes Research, Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Canada; Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, Canada.
5
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Canada.
6
Faculty of Medicine (Neurology), Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Canada.
7
Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Canada; Health Care and Outcomes Research, Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Canada; Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Canada; Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Canada.
8
Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Health Information, 70 O'Leary Avenue, St. John's, NL, Canada.
9
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
10
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
11
School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
12
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada.
13
Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
14
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
15
School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; School of Health Sciences, Central Michigan University, Michigan,United States.
16
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University,Canada.
17
Health Sciences Library, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
18
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; School of Life Science, Changchun Normal University, Changchun, Jilin 130032,China.
19
Brain Research Centre, Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia,Canada.

Abstract

Systematic reviews were conducted to identify risk factors associated with the onset and progression of 14 neurological conditions, prioritized as a component of the National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions. These systematic reviews provided a basis for evaluating the weight of evidence of evidence for risk factors for the onset and progression of the 14 individual neurological conditions considered. A number of risk factors associated with an increased risk of onset for more than one condition, including exposure to pesticides (associated with an increased risk of AD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain tumours, and PD; smoking (AD, MS); and infection (MS, Tourette syndrome). Coffee and tea intake was associated with a decreased risk of onset of both dystonia and PD. Further understanding of the etiology of priority neurological conditions will be helpful in focusing future research initiatives and in the development of interventions to reduce the burden associated with neurological conditions in Canada and internationally.

KEYWORDS:

Burden of neurological disease; Intervention; Meta-analyses; Mitigation; Modifiable; Neurological conditions; Onset; Progression; Risk factors; Systematic reviews

PMID:
28410962
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuro.2017.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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