Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurol Clin. 2017 May;35(2):263-281. doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2017.01.005.

Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease.

Author information

1
Behavioral Neurology Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 300 Westwood Plaza, Suite B-200, Box 956975, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Neurobehavior Unit, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, Building 206, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA. Electronic address: mfmendez@mednet.ucla.edu.

Abstract

Early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD), with onset in individuals younger than 65 years, although overshadowed by the more common late-onset AD (LOAD), differs significantly from LOAD. EOAD comprises approximately 5% of AD and is associated with delays in diagnosis, aggressive course, and age-related psychosocial needs. One source of confusion is that a substantial percentage of EOAD are phenotypic variants that differ from the usual memory-disordered presentation of typical AD. The management of EOAD is similar to that for LOAD, but special emphasis should be placed on targeting the specific cognitive areas involved and more age-appropriate psychosocial support and education.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer disease; Dementia; Early-onset dementia; Logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia; Progressive cortical atrophy; Young-onset dementia

PMID:
28410659
PMCID:
PMC5407192
DOI:
10.1016/j.ncl.2017.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center