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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017 Apr 14;11(4):e0005482. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005482. eCollection 2017 Apr.

Controlling cholera in the Ouest Department of Haiti using oral vaccines.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.
2
Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.
3
Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, Florida, United States of America.
4
Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.
5
Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

Abstract

Following the 2010 cholera outbreak in Haiti, a plan was initiated to provide massive improvements to the sanitation and drinking water infrastructure in order to eliminate cholera from the island of Hispaniola by 2023. Six years and a half billion dollars later, there is little evidence that any substantial improvements have been implemented; with increasing evidence that cholera has become endemic. Thus, it is time to explore strategies to control cholera in Haiti using oral cholera vaccines (OCVs). The potential effects of mass administration of OCVs on cholera transmission were assessed using dynamic compartment models fit to cholera incidence data from the Ouest Department of Haiti. The results indicated that interventions using an OCV that was 60% effective could have eliminated cholera transmission by August 2012 if started five weeks after the initial outbreak. A range of analyses on the ability of OCV interventions started January 1, 2017 to eliminate cholera transmission by 2023 were performed by considering different combinations of vaccine efficacies, vaccine administration rates, and durations of protective immunity. With an average of 50 weeks for the waiting time to vaccination and an average duration of three years for the vaccine-induced immunity, all campaigns that used an OCV with a vaccine efficacy of at least 60% successfully eliminated cholera transmission by 2023. The results of this study suggest that even with a relatively wide range of vaccine efficacies, administration rates, and durations of protective immunity, future epidemics could be controlled at a relatively low cost using mass administration of OCVs in Haiti.

PMID:
28410382
PMCID:
PMC5406029
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0005482
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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