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Cell Host Microbe. 2017 Apr 12;21(4):455-466.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2017.03.002.

Age-Associated Microbial Dysbiosis Promotes Intestinal Permeability, Systemic Inflammation, and Macrophage Dysfunction.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; McMaster Immunology Research Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
2
Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
3
Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; Department of Biochemistry & Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
4
Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
5
Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; Department of Biochemistry & Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
6
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
7
University of Edinburgh/MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, Queen's Medical Research Institute, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK.
8
Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
9
Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; McMaster Immunology Research Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada; Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada. Electronic address: bowdish@mcmaster.ca.

Abstract

Levels of inflammatory mediators in circulation are known to increase with age, but the underlying cause of this age-associated inflammation is debated. We find that, when maintained under germ-free conditions, mice do not display an age-related increase in circulating pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. A higher proportion of germ-free mice live to 600 days than their conventional counterparts, and macrophages derived from aged germ-free mice maintain anti-microbial activity. Co-housing germ-free mice with old, but not young, conventionally raised mice increases pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood. In tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-deficient mice, which are protected from age-associated inflammation, age-related microbiota changes are not observed. Furthermore, age-associated microbiota changes can be reversed by reducing TNF using anti-TNF therapy. These data suggest that aging-associated microbiota promote inflammation and that reversing these age-related microbiota changes represents a potential strategy for reducing age-associated inflammation and the accompanying morbidity.

KEYWORDS:

Streptococcus pneumoniae; elderly; host defense; immunosenescence; inflamm-aging; inflammation; macrophage; microbiome; microbiota

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PMID:
28407483
PMCID:
PMC5392495
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2017.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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