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World J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2017 May;33(5):94. doi: 10.1007/s11274-017-2259-9. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

Omics analysis of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Geng P1,2, Zhang L3,4, Shi GY1,2.

Author information

1
The Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology of Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China.
2
National Engineering Laboratory for Cereal Fermentation Technology, Jiangnan University, 1800 Lihu Road, Wuxi, 214122, China.
3
The Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology of Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China. zhangl@jiangnan.edu.cn.
4
National Engineering Laboratory for Cereal Fermentation Technology, Jiangnan University, 1800 Lihu Road, Wuxi, 214122, China. zhangl@jiangnan.edu.cn.

Abstract

Acetic acid is an inhibitor in industrial processes such as wine making and bioethanol production from cellulosic hydrolysate. It causes energy depletion, inhibition of metabolic enzyme activity, growth arrest and ethanol productivity losses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of the yeast responses to acetic acid stress is essential for improving acetic acid tolerance and ethanol production. Although 329 genes associated with acetic acid tolerance have been identified in the Saccharomyces genome and included in the database ( http://www.yeastgenome.org/observable/resistance_to_acetic_acid/overview ), the cellular mechanistic responses to acetic acid remain unclear in this organism. Post-genomic approaches such as transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and chemogenomics are being applied to yeast and are providing insight into the mechanisms and interactions of genes, proteins and other components that together determine complex quantitative phenotypic traits such as acetic acid tolerance. This review focuses on these omics approaches in the response to acetic acid in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, several novel strains with improved acetic acid tolerance have been engineered by modifying key genes, and the application of these strains and recently acquired knowledge to industrial processes is also discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Acetic acid tolerance; Industrial strain; Omics analysis; Post-genomic approach; Saccharomyces cerevisiae

PMID:
28405910
DOI:
10.1007/s11274-017-2259-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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