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Eur J Nutr. 2017 Apr 12. doi: 10.1007/s00394-017-1448-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Effects of coconut oil consumption on energy metabolism, cardiometabolic risk markers, and appetitive responses in women with excess body fat.

Author information

1
Departamento de Nutrição e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Avenida PH Rolfs, s/n., Viçosa, Minas Gerais, CEP: 36570-900, Brazil.
2
Departamento de Nutrição e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Avenida PH Rolfs, s/n., Viçosa, Minas Gerais, CEP: 36570-900, Brazil. jbressan@ufv.br.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is a medium-chain fatty acid source with popularly attributed benefits on obesity management. However, its role on obesity requires elucidation due to its saturated nature. In the study herein, we investigated acute effects of VCO consumption on energy metabolism, cardiometabolic risk markers, and appetitive responses in women with excess body fat.

METHODS:

Fifteen adult women with excess body fat (37.43 ± 0.83%) participated in this randomized, crossover, controlled study. Two isocaloric mixed breakfasts containing 25 mL of VCO or control (extra-virgin olive oil-C) were evaluated. Resting energy expenditure (REE), fat oxidation rate (FOR), diet induced thermogenesis (DIT) and appetitive subjective responses were assessed at fasting and postprandial periods (up to 240 min). Cardiometabolic risk markers were assessed at fasting and up to 180 min postprandially.

RESULTS:

VCO did not affect REE, FOR, and DIT compared to C. In addition, VCO did not cause deleterious change in triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c, triglycerides/HDL-c ratio, uric acid, glucose and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance Index (HOMA-IR) (P time×treatment > 0.05). However, VCO suppressed less hunger (P time×treatment = 0.003), total satiety (P iAUC = 0.021) and total fullness (P iAUC = 0.035) responses than C.

CONCLUSIONS:

VCO consumption did not acutely change energy metabolism and cardiometabolic risk markers when added to a mixed breakfast but promoted less appetitive responses.

KEYWORDS:

Appetite; Cardiometabolic risk markers; Coconut oil; Energy metabolism; Fat oxidation

PMID:
28405814
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-017-1448-5

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