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Public Health. 2017 Mar 6;147:15-19. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2017.02.007. [Epub ahead of print]

Hypertension and correlates among Montenegrin schoolchildren-a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Medical Faculty, Department for Pathophysiology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro. Electronic address: milicam@ac.me.
2
Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Hygiene and Medical Ecology, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: goran.belojevic@hotmail.com.
3
Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; Department of Human Development, Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA. Electronic address: gwe1@cornell.edu.
4
Public Health Center, Podgorica, Montenegro. Electronic address: nenok@t-com.me.
5
Medical Faculty, Neurosurgery Clinic, University of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro. Electronic address: basanin@ac.me.
6
Medical Faculty, Department of Biochemistry, University of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro. Electronic address: snezap@ac.me.
7
Clinical Centre of Montenegro, Centre for Laboratory Diagnostics, Podgorica, Montenegro. Electronic address: marinajaksic@ymail.com.
8
Clinical Centre of Montenegro, Centre for Laboratory Diagnostics, Podgorica, Montenegro. Electronic address: jellenabpg@yahoo.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

In one of the few national studies of children in a former Eastern bloc country emerging as a Western democracy and the first such study ever in Montenegro, this study establishes the prevalence and correlates of childhood hypertension (CH).

STUDY DESIGN:

A cross-sectional national study.

METHODS:

The study was conducted with 3254 children aged 7-13 years (50.3% male) from 39 elementary schools. We used a structured questionnaire to gather sociodemographic information as well as data on factors potentially related to CH. Children's nutritional status was assessed using the criteria of the International Obesity Task Force. Waist circumference was also measured. Blood pressure was measured in schools using an oscillometric monitor. CH was defined as an average systolic blood pressure and/or diastolic blood pressure greater than or equal to the 95th percentile for sex, age, and height.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of CH was 10.4% with no differences between boys and girls. Multiple regression revealed that the odds for child hypertension were lowered by 10% for each year of age. On the other hand, rural environment and child obesity raised the odds of hypertension by 38% and 68%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found hypertension in one out of ten Montenegrin schoolchildren, with no gender differences. Obesity and rural areas may be unfriendly to children's blood pressure.

KEYWORDS:

Blood pressure; Child; Hypertension; Risk factors

PMID:
28404491
DOI:
10.1016/j.puhe.2017.02.007
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