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Metabolism. 2017 May;70:57-71. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2017.01.032. Epub 2017 Feb 4.

Vitamin K and osteoporosis: Myth or reality?

Author information

1
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, 00128 Rome, Italy.
2
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, 00128 Rome, Italy. Electronic address: d.tuccinardi@unicampus.it.
3
Department of Experimental Medicine, Polo Pontino, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy.
4
Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Medical Physiopathology and Endocrinology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy.

Abstract

Vitamin K is a liposoluble vitamin. The predominant dietary form, phylloquinone or vitamin K1, is found in plants and green vegetables; whereas menaquinone, or vitamin K2, is endogenously synthesized by intestinal bacteria and includes several subtypes that differ in side chain length. Aside from its established role in blood clotting, several studies now support a critical function of vitamin K in improving bone health. Vitamin K is in fact required for osteocalcin carboxylation that in turn regulates bone mineral accretion; it seems to promote the transition of osteoblasts to osteocytes and also limits the process of osteoclastogenesis. Several observational and interventional studies have examined the relationship between vitamin K and bone metabolism, but findings are conflicting and unclear. This systematic review aims to investigate the impact of vitamin K (plasma levels, dietary intake, and oral supplementation) on bone health with a particular interest in bone remodeling, mineral density and fragility fractures.

KEYWORDS:

BMD; Fracture; Osteoporosis; Vitamin K1; Vitamin K2

PMID:
28403946
DOI:
10.1016/j.metabol.2017.01.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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