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PLoS One. 2017 Apr 12;12(4):e0175304. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175304. eCollection 2017.

Prevalence and genotype distribution of hepatitis delta virus among chronic hepatitis B carriers in Central Vietnam.

Author information

1
Center for Molecular Biology, Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang, Vietnam.
2
Department of Molecular Biology, 108 Military Central Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
3
Institute of Tropical Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
4
German Center for Infection Research, Department for Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endocrinology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
5
Vietnamese-German Center for Medical Research, Hanoi, Vietnam.
6
Department of Infectious Diseases, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection plays an important role in liver diseases. However, the molecular epidemiology and impact of HDV infection in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remain uncertain in Vietnam. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the prevalence and genotype distribution of HDV among HBsAg-positive patients in Central Vietnam. 250 CHB patients were tested for HDV using newly established HDV-specific RT-PCR techniques. HDV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing. Of the 250 patients 25 (10%) had detectable copies of HDV viral RNA. HDV-2 was predominant (20/25; 80%) followed by HDV-1 (5/25; 20%). Proven HDV genotypes share the Asian nomenclature. Chronic hepatitis B patients with concomitant HDV-1 showed higher HBV loads as compared to HDV-2 infected patients [median log10 (HBV-DNA copies/ml): 8.5 vs. 4.4, P = 0.036]. Our findings indicate that HDV infection is highly prevalent and HDV-2 is predominant in Central Vietnam. The data will add new information to the management of HBsAg-positive patients in a highly HBV endemic region to in- or exclude HDV infection in terms of diagnostic and treatment options.

PMID:
28403190
PMCID:
PMC5389633
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0175304
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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