Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12(1):40. doi: 10.1007/s11657-017-0333-4. Epub 2017 Apr 11.

Calcium intake, bone mineral density, and fragility fractures: evidence from an Italian outpatient population.

Author information

1
Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139, Florence, Italy.
2
Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit, University Hospital AOU-Careggi, Largo Palagi 1, 50139, Florence, Italy.
3
Department of Neurosciences, Psychology, Drug Research, and Child Health (section of Psychology), University of Florence, Via di San Salvi 12, 50139, Florence, Italy.
4
Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139, Florence, Italy. marialuisa.brandi@unifi.it.

Abstract

This study was performed in 1000 adult Italian subjects to focus on the effects of dietary calcium intake on bone health. A higher fracture risk appears to be associated with a reduced calcium intake. An adequate daily calcium intake is recommended to counteract osteoporotic fractures.

PURPOSE:

The principal aim of the present study was to focus on the effects of dietary calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) and fragility fractures in a representative sample of an adult Italian outpatient population.

METHODS:

The study group consisted of 1000 consecutive adult Italian subjects [838 women (F) and 162 men (M)] referred to the Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit for the evaluation of their bone metabolism. Daily dietary calcium intake was assessed using a specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Other evaluations included fracture risk, lumbar and femoral BMD, heel ultrasound, fragility fractures, plasma concentration of parathyroid hormone ([PTH]) and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D ([25(OH)D]), and urinary calcium.

RESULTS:

Only 10.4% of the subjects (n = 104; 71 F and 33 M) had a daily calcium intake adequate for adults (≥1000 mg/day). No correlation was found between calcium intake and BMD. The transition from a daily dietary calcium intake <400 mg/day to a daily dietary calcium intake ≥400 mg/day was associated with a reduced fracture probability ratio at any site [from 42 to 21% (p < 0.05)]. Subjects with one or more vertebral fractures had a significantly lower dietary calcium intake (<400 mg/day) than did subjects without vertebral fractures, and they practiced physical activity only occasionally (p = 0.030).

CONCLUSIONS:

Daily dietary calcium intake is lower than the recommended daily intake in an Italian ambulatory population, and a higher fracture risk appears to be associated with a reduced calcium intake. An age-adequate daily calcium intake, combined with regular physical activity, is strongly recommended in order to counteract fragility fractures.

KEYWORDS:

Bone mineral density; Calcium intake; Fragility fractures; Physical activity

PMID:
28401496
DOI:
10.1007/s11657-017-0333-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center