Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Care. 2017 Aug;40(8):1026-1033. doi: 10.2337/dc16-1458. Epub 2017 Apr 11.

BMI and All-Cause Mortality in Normoglycemia, Impaired Fasting Glucose, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Prevalent Diabetes: A Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung, Republic of Korea flyhigh@cku.ac.kr.
4
Big Data Steering Department, National Health Insurance Service, Wonju, Republic of Korea.
5
Institute for Occupational and Environmental Health, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined associations between BMI and mortality in individuals with normoglycemia, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), newly diagnosed diabetes, and prevalent diabetes and identified BMI ranges associated with the lowest mortality in each group.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

A total of 12,815,006 adults were prospectively monitored until 2013. Diabetes status was defined as follows: normoglycemia (fasting glucose <100 mg/dL), IFG (100-125 mg/dL), newly diagnosed diabetes (≥126 mg/dL), and prevalent diabetes (self-reported). BMI (kg/m2) was measured. Cox proportional hazards model hazard ratios were calculated after adjusting for confounders.

RESULTS:

During a mean follow-up period of 10.5 years, 454,546 men and 239,877 women died. U-shaped associations were observed regardless of diabetes status, sex, age, and smoking history. Optimal BMI (kg/m2) for the lowest mortality by group was 23.5-27.9 (normoglycemia), 25-27.9 (IFG), 25-29.4 (newly diagnosed diabetes), and 26.5-29.4 (prevalent diabetes). Higher optimal BMI by worsening diabetes status was more prominent in younger ages, especially in women. The relationship between worsening diabetes status and higher mortality was stronger with lower BMI, especially at younger ages. Given the same BMI, people with prevalent diabetes had higher mortality compared with those with newly diagnosed diabetes, and this was more striking in women than men.

CONCLUSIONS:

U-curve relationships existed regardless of diabetes status. Optimal BMI for lowest mortality became gradually higher with worsening diabetes for each sex and each age-group.

PMID:
28400430
DOI:
10.2337/dc16-1458
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center