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Neurosci Res. 2017 Sep;122:25-34. doi: 10.1016/j.neures.2017.04.001. Epub 2017 Apr 9.

Elucidation of developmental patterns of marmoset corpus callosum through a comparative MRI in marmosets, chimpanzees, and humans.

Author information

1
The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Aichi 484-8506, Japan; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo 102-0083, Japan. Electronic address: sakai.tomoko.5w@gmail.com.
2
Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Central Institute for Experimental Animals, 3-25-12 Tonomachi, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 210-0821, Japan.
3
Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Central Institute for Experimental Animals, 3-25-12 Tonomachi, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 210-0821, Japan; RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Laboratory for Marmoset Neural Architecture, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.
4
Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Aichi 484-8506, Japan; Faculty of Nursing and Rehabilitation, Chubu Gakuin University, Seki, Gifu 504-0837, Japan.
5
Department of Cognitive Science, Institute of Liberal Arts and Science, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japan.
6
The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
7
Central Institute for Experimental Animals, 3-25-12 Tonomachi, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 210-0821, Japan; RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Laboratory for Marmoset Neural Architecture, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan; Advanced Research Center, Keio University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan. Electronic address: esasaki@ciea.or.jp.
8
Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Laboratory for Marmoset Neural Architecture, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan. Electronic address: hidokano@a2.keio.jp.

Abstract

The corpus callosum (CC) is present in all primate brains and is the major white matter tract connecting the cerebral hemispheres for integration of sensory, motor and higher-order cognitive information. The midsagittal area of the CC has frequently been used as a sensitive biomarker of brain development. Although the marmoset has been considered as an alternative non-human primate model for neuroscience research, the developmental patterns of the CC have not been explored. The present longitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that marmosets show a rapid increase of CC during infancy, followed by a slow increase during the juvenile stage, as observed in chimpanzees and humans. Marmosets also show a tendency toward a greater increase in CC during late infancy and the juvenile stage, as observed in humans, but not in chimpanzees. However, several differences between marmosets and humans were identified. There was a tendency toward a greater maturation of the human CC during early infancy. Furthermore, there was a tendency toward a greater increase during late infancy and the juvenile stage in marmosets, compared to that observed in chimpanzees and humans. These differences in the developmental trajectories of the CC may be related to evolutional changes in social behavior.

KEYWORDS:

Brain development; Brain evolution; Chimpanzees; Corpus callosum; Humans; Magnetic resonance imaging; Marmosets

PMID:
28400206
DOI:
10.1016/j.neures.2017.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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