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Pediatr Diabetes. 2018 Feb;19(1):129-137. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12527. Epub 2017 Apr 11.

Endocrine and metabolic consequences due to restrictive carbohydrate diets in children with type 1 diabetes: An illustrative case series.

de Bock M1,2,3, Lobley K4, Anderson D5,6,7, Davis E1,2,3, Donaghue K8,9, Pappas M5,6,7, Siafarikas A1,2,3,10, Cho YH11,12, Jones T1,2,3, Smart C5,6,7.

Author information

1
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
2
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Australia.
3
The School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
4
The Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia.
5
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, Australia.
6
University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia.
7
Mothers and Babies Group Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, Australia.
8
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, Australia.
9
Sydney Medical School University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
10
Institute for Health Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Australia.
11
Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia.
12
Discipline of Child and Adolescent Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

Low carbohydrate diets for the management of type 1 diabetes have been popularised by social media. The promotion of a low carbohydrate diet in lay media is in contrast to published pediatric diabetes guidelines that endorse a balanced diet from a variety of foods for optimal growth and development in children with type 1 diabetes. This can be a source of conflict in clinical practice. We describe a series of 6 cases where adoption of a low carbohydrate diet in children impacted growth and cardiovascular risk factors with potential long-term sequelae. These cases support current clinical guidelines for children with diabetes that promote a diet where total energy intake is derived from balanced macronutrient sources.

KEYWORDS:

carbohydrate; children; growth; nutrition; type 1 diabetes

PMID:
28397413
DOI:
10.1111/pedi.12527
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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