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Front Nutr. 2017 Mar 27;4:10. doi: 10.3389/fnut.2017.00010. eCollection 2017.

Egg Consumption and Incidence of Heart Failure: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center , Toledo, OH , USA.
2
Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology and Research Information Center (MAVERIC), Boston Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), Boston Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), Boston Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Heart failure (HF) remains a major health problem affecting 5.7 million adults in USA. Data on the association of egg consumption with incident HF have been inconsistent. We, therefore, conducted this meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to assess the relation of egg consumption with incident HF in the general population.

METHODS:

Using extensive online search, we conducted a meta-analysis of new onset HF following exposure to egg consumption. A random effects model was used and between studies heterogeneity was estimated with I2. Publication bias was assessed graphically using a funnel plot. All analyses were performed with Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (version 2.2.064).

RESULTS:

We identified four prospective cohorts for a total of 105,999 subjects and 5,059 cases of new onset HF. When comparing the highest (≥1/day) to the lowest category of egg consumption, pooled relative risk of HF was 1.25 (95% confidence interval = 1.12-1.39; p = 0.00). There was no evidence for heterogeneity (I2 = 0%) nor publication bias. On sensitivity analysis, stratification by gender differences, follow-up duration, and region where study was conducted did not alter the main conclusion.

CONCLUSION:

Our meta-analysis suggests an elevated risk of incident HF with frequent egg consumption.

KEYWORDS:

diet; eggs; epidemiology; heart failure; nutrition

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