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Psychiatry Res. 2017 Jul;253:233-239. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.03.057. Epub 2017 Apr 4.

Predictors of using trains as a suicide method: Findings from Victoria, Australia.

Author information

1
Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: tiffany.too@unimelb.edu.au.
2
Department of Forensic Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
3
Deakin Population Health SRC, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia; Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
4
Harvard Injury Control Research Center, Harvard School of Public Health, Massachusetts, United States.
5
Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with the choice of trains over other means of suicide. We performed a case-control study using data on all suicides in Victoria, Australia between 2009 and 2012. Cases were those who died by rail suicide and controls were those who died by suicide by any other means. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the association between the choice of trains and a range of individual-level and neighbourhood-level factors. Individuals who were never married had double odds of using trains compared to individuals who were married. Those from areas with a higher proportion of people who travel to work by train also had greater odds of dying by railway suicide compared to those from areas with a relatively lower proportion of people who travel to work by train. Prevention efforts should consider limiting access to the railways and other evidence-based suicide prevention activities.

KEYWORDS:

Australia; Railroads; Railway; Suicide

PMID:
28395228
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.03.057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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