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Rev Diabet Stud. 2016 Winter;13(4):246-256. doi: 10.1900/RDS.2016.13.246. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

Dietary Patterns and 10-year (2002-2012) Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes: Results from the ATTICA Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
2
First Cardiology Clinic, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece.

Abstract

AIM:

To identify dietary patterns among apparently healthy individuals and to determine their long-term effect on diabetes incidence.

METHODS:

During 2001-2002, a random sample of 3,042 men and women (18-89 years old), living in greater Athens, was randomly selected to participate in the study. During 2011-2012, the 10-year follow-up was performed in 2,583 participants (15% drop-out rate). After excluding participants with diabetes at baseline and those for whom no information on diabetes status was available at follow-up, the working sample consisted of 1,485 participants. Dietary habits were assessed by means of a validated semi-quantitative, food frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis was performed to extract dietary patterns from 18 food groups.

RESULTS:

Diabetes diagnosis at follow-up was made in 191 participants, yielding an incidence rate of 12.9%. Six factors (i.e. dietary patterns) were identified that explained 54% of the variation in consumption. After adjusting for major confounders, and stratification by age-group, logistic regression revealed that the most healthful pattern consisted of the consumption of fruits, vegetables, legumes, bread, rusk, and pasta which reduced the 10-year diabetes risk by 40%, among participants aged 45-55 years. The association reached marginal statistical significance (95% CI: 0.34, 1.07), while no significant association was observed for the other age-groups. When the analysis was additionally adjusted for carbohydrate percentage, statistical significance was lost completely, suggesting a possibly mediating effect of this macronutrient.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results confirm the potentially protective effect of a plant-based dietary pattern in the primary prevention of diabetes, in particular among middle-aged people. Carbohydrate content may be a specific factor in this relationship; other micronutrients found in plant-based food groups may also play a role.

PMID:
28394951
PMCID:
PMC5734225
DOI:
10.1900/RDS.2016.13.246
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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