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J Community Health. 2017 Oct;42(5):911-920. doi: 10.1007/s10900-017-0334-7.

Improving HPV Vaccination Through a Diverse Multi-state Coalition.

Author information

1
University of Utah College of Nursing, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA. echo.warner@hci.utah.edu.
2
Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, New York, NY, 10021, USA. echo.warner@hci.utah.edu.
3
Cancer Control and Population Sciences Department, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA. echo.warner@hci.utah.edu.
4
Cancer Control and Population Sciences Department, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA.
5
University of Utah College of Nursing, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Rural and highly religious Intermountain West states demonstrate low levels of HPV vaccination uptake. The Intermountain West HPV Vaccination Coalition (IWHVC) was formed to improve HPV vaccination by enhancing collaborations between cancer centers, health departments, health clinics, religious groups, and community organizations. Coalition members' perceptions and experiences are described within.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional online survey was distributed to the IWHVC. N = 86 responded to the online survey. Six subsequent focus groups were conducted (N = 36). Participant demographics, barriers, and facilitators of HPV vaccination were summarized. The first three focus groups were coded in an iterative manner based on a coding scheme. The final three focus groups were selectively coded for content related to five themes: barriers and facilitators to HPV vaccination, how the coalition has been useful, future directions of the coalition, and how to engage religious communities.

RESULTS:

Participants suggested that HPV vaccination should occur in a doctor's office (70.9%), public health clinic (64.0%), or at a community health fair (58.1%). Perceived barriers included a lack of education/low knowledge about the HPV vaccine (55.8%), concerns about sexuality/promiscuity (44.2%), and not knowing the vaccine is recommended for boys (38.4%). Participants stressed the importance of gaining buy-in from religious leaders, and felt the coalition helped them advocate for HPV vaccination through networking, idea and information sharing, and voicing their community's needs. Future goals emphasized targeted outreach, sustainable funding, expanded environmental scans, gaining religious support, and policy reforms.

CONCLUSIONS:

Targeted coalition work builds community capacity and coordinates HPV vaccination efforts. A community driven coalition approach could help improve HPV vaccination in other rural and highly religious regions.

KEYWORDS:

Coalition; HPV vaccination; Intermountain West; Religious; Rural

PMID:
28393294
DOI:
10.1007/s10900-017-0334-7

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