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J Adolesc Health. 2017 Aug;61(2):155-162. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.02.004. Epub 2017 Apr 5.

E-cigarette Use, Cigarette Smoking, Dual Use, and Problem Behaviors Among U.S. Adolescents: Results From a National Survey.

Author information

1
Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: plius@umich.edu.
2
Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
3
Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
4
Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; School of Nursing, Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Psychiatry, Addiction Research Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

There is a need to obtain greater clarity regarding adolescents' e-cigarette use and the associations of use with a wider range of risk behaviors. This study examines the associations among past-month e-cigarette use only, traditional cigarette smoking only, dual use (i.e., concurrent e-cigarette use and cigarette smoking), school-related (i.e., truancy and poor academic performance) risk behaviors, and substance-related (i.e., alcohol use, binge drinking, marijuana use, illicit drug use, and nonmedical prescription drug use) risk behaviors.

METHODS:

Data were collected via self-administered questionnaires from a nationally representative sample of 8,696 high school seniors.

RESULTS:

An estimated 9.9% of U.S. high school seniors reported past-month e-cigarette use only, 6.0% reported past-month cigarette smoking only, and 7.3% reported past-month dual use. School- and substance-related risk behaviors had strong associations with past-month e-cigarette use. Adolescents who only used e-cigarettes had significantly greater odds of all school- and substance-related risk behaviors relative to nonusers. Dual users had significantly greater odds of frequent/daily e-cigarette use as well as all school- and substance-related risk behaviors relative to those who only used e-cigarettes. Finally, adolescents who engaged in frequent/daily e-cigarette use had significantly greater odds of binge drinking, marijuana use, other illicit drug use and nonmedical prescription drug use, relative to experimental e-cigarette users.

CONCLUSIONS:

E-cigarette use is common among U.S. adolescents, and there are robust associations between e-cigarette use and school- and substance-related risk behaviors. There is evidence that e-cigarette use clusters with risk behaviors and appears to represent a problem behavior, especially dual use of e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes.

KEYWORDS:

Academic performance; Adolescence; Cigarette smoking; E-cigarette; Epidemiology; High school; Problem behaviors; Substance use

PMID:
28391965
PMCID:
PMC5522777
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.02.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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