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J Clin Lipidol. 2017 Jan - Feb;11(1):126-135.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.jacl.2016.10.015. Epub 2016 Nov 10.

Individual omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acids and mortality-The Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study.

Author information

1
Fifth Department of Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
2
Department of Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology, Institute of Nutrition, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany; Competence Cluster of Nutrition and Cardiovascular Health (nutriCARD), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Jena, Germany.
3
Fifth Department of Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria; Synlab Academy, Synlab Holding Deutschland GmbH, Mannheim and Augsburg, Germany.
4
Omegametrix, Martinsried, Germany; Department of Preventive Cardiology, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.
5
Fifth Department of Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; Department of Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology, Institute of Nutrition, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany; Competence Cluster of Nutrition and Cardiovascular Health (nutriCARD), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Jena, Germany. Electronic address: marcus.kleber@medma.uni-heidelberg.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The association of polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids with mortality has been extensively studied. Far less is known about the association of omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acids (omega-9 MUFA) with mortality.

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to study the association of individual omega-MUFA with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.

METHODS:

Omega-9 MUFA concentrations were measured in erythrocytes in 3259 patients participating in the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study using the HS-Omega-3 index method. Associations with mortality were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression with adjustment for conventional risk factors separately for men and women.

RESULTS:

During a median follow-up of 10.0 years, 975 patients (29.9%) died. Partial correlation analysis adjusted for age and gender showed inverse correlations of oleic acid (OA), gondoic acid (GA), and nervonic acid (NA) with LDL-C, HDL-C, and eGFR but direct correlations with markers of inflammation and endothelial activation as well as heart failure. A 1-SD increase in OA, GA, and NA was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality with HRs (95% CI) of 1.08 (1.01-1.16), 1.07 (1.01-1.13), and 1.12 (1.05-1.20), respectively. NA was the only omega-9 MUFA being associated with increased risk in men, whereas in women also GA was associated with risk. The association between OA and mortality seems to be U-shaped with a nadir at a concentration of approx 14%.

CONCLUSIONS:

All three omega-9 MUFA showed direct associations with mortality. Further studies are warranted to explore biologic and prognostic properties of omega-9 fatty acids, with a focus on nervonic acid.

KEYWORDS:

Monounsaturated fatty acids; Mortality; Nervonic acid; Nutrition; Oleic acid

PMID:
28391879
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacl.2016.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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