Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Actas Urol Esp. 2017 Oct;41(8):522-528. doi: 10.1016/j.acuro.2016.12.009. Epub 2017 Apr 5.

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with lower urinary tract symptoms and sexual function.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Departamento de Urología, Hospital Universitario de la Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, Bogotá D.C., Colombia; Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá D.C., Colombia. Electronic address: mplata@uniandes.edu.co.
2
Departamento de Urología, Hospital Universitario de la Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, Bogotá D.C., Colombia; Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá D.C., Colombia.
3
Departamento de Urología, Hospital Universitario de la Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, Bogotá D.C., Colombia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To estimate the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a daily urology practice and to determine its association with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction (ED).

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A retrospective study was conducted. Data from all male patients aged ≥40 years who attended our outpatient urology clinic from 2010 to 2011 was collected. Prevalence of MetS was determined, and LUTS and ED were assessed. A logistic model was used to determine possible associations, controlling for confounders and interaction factors.

RESULTS:

A total of 616 patients were included. MetS was observed in 43.8% (95% CI 39.6-48.3). The bivariate model showed an association between MetS and LUTS (p<0.01), but not between MetS and ED. The logistic model showed an association between MetS and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), while controlling for other variables. Patients exhibiting moderate LUTS had a greater risk for MetS than patients with mild LUTS (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.14-2.94). After analyzing for individual components of MetS, positive associations were found between diabetes and severe LUTS (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.24-7.1), and between diabetes and ED (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.12-5.8).

CONCLUSION:

This study was able to confirm an association between MetS and LUTS, but not for ED. Specific components such as diabetes were associated to both. Geographical differences previously reported in the literature might account for these findings. Given that MetS is frequent among urological patients, it is advisable that urologists actively screen for it.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes mellitus tipo 2; Diabetes mellitus type 2; Disfunción eréctil; Erectile dysfunction; Lower urinary tract symptoms; Metabolic syndrome; Obesidad; Obesity; Síndrome metabólico; Síntomas del tracto urinario inferior

PMID:
28390836
DOI:
10.1016/j.acuro.2016.12.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center