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Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2017 May;43(2):287-302. doi: 10.1016/j.rdc.2016.12.011.

Menopause and Rheumatic Disease.

Author information

1
Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 1000 Lincoln Blvd, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.
2
Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 1000 Lincoln Blvd, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA; Arthritis & Clinical Immunology Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, 825 Northeast 13th Street, MS 24, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA; Medical Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 920 NE 13th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA. Electronic address: hal-scofield@omrf.ouhsc.edu.

Abstract

Menopause occurs naturally in women at about 50 years of age. There is a wealth of data concerning the relationship of menopause to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis; there are limited data concerning other rheumatic diseases. Age at menopause may affect the risk and course of rheumatic diseases. Osteoporosis, an integral part of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is made worse by menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been studied; its effects vary depending on the disease and even different manifestations within the same disease. Cyclophosphamide can induce early menopause, but there is underlying decreased ovarian reserve in rheumatic diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Menopause; Osteoarthritis; Rheumatoid arthritis; Systemic lupus erythematosus

PMID:
28390570
PMCID:
PMC5385852
DOI:
10.1016/j.rdc.2016.12.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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