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Pediatr Res. 2017 Jul;82(1):79-86. doi: 10.1038/pr.2017.104. Epub 2017 May 3.

Cannabidiol reduces lung injury induced by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn piglets.

Author information

1
Department of Neonatology, Hospital Clínico San Carlos-IdISSC, Madrid, Spain.
2
Health Research Institute Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Pathology, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
4
Intensive Care Translational Research Group, Biocruces Health Research Institute, Bizkaia, Spain.
5
GW Research, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

BackgroundBrain hypoxic-ischemic (HI) damage induces distant inflammatory lung damage in newborn pigs. We aimed to investigate the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on lung damage in this scenario.MethodsNewborn piglets received intravenous vehicle, CBD, or CBD+WAY100635 (5-HT1A receptor antagonist) after HI brain damage (carotid flow interruption and FiO2 0.10 for 30 min). Total lung compliance (TLC), oxygenation index (OI), and extravascular lung water content (EVLW) were monitored for 6 h. Histological damage, interleukin (IL)-1β concentration, and oxidative stress were assessed in brain and lung tissue. Total protein content was determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF).ResultsCBD prevented HI-induced deleterious effects on TLC and OI and reduced lung histological damage, modulating inflammation (decreased leukocyte infiltration and IL-1 concentration) and reducing protein content in BALF and EVLW. These effects were related to CBD-induced anti-inflammatory changes in the brain. HI did not increase oxidative stress in the lungs. In the lungs, WAY100635 blunted the beneficial effects of CBD on histological damage, IL-1 concentration, and EVLW.ConclusionsCBD reduced brain HI-induced distant lung damage, with 5-HT1A receptor involvement in these effects. Whether the effects of CBD on the lungs were due to the anti-inflammatory effects on the brain or due to the direct effects on the lungs remains to be elucidated.

PMID:
28388598
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2017.104
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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