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Trends Cogn Sci. 2017 May;21(5):313-332. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2017.02.005. Epub 2017 Apr 3.

The Cerebellum: Adaptive Prediction for Movement and Cognition.

Author information

1
Service de Neurologie, Département des Neurosciences Cliniques, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne 1011, Switzerland; Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK. Electronic address: arseny.sokolov@chuv.ch.
2
School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
3
Department of Psychology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley 94720, USA.

Abstract

Over the past 30 years, cumulative evidence has indicated that cerebellar function extends beyond sensorimotor control. This view has emerged from studies of neuroanatomy, neuroimaging, neuropsychology, and brain stimulation, with the results implicating the cerebellum in domains as diverse as attention, language, executive function, and social cognition. Although the literature provides sophisticated models of how the cerebellum helps refine movements, it remains unclear how the core mechanisms of these models can be applied when considering a broader conceptualization of cerebellar function. In light of recent multidisciplinary findings, we examine how two key concepts that have been suggested as general computational principles of cerebellar function- prediction and error-based learning- might be relevant in the operation of cognitive cerebro-cerebellar loops.

KEYWORDS:

cerebellum; cognition; language; learning; prediction; social cognition

PMID:
28385461
PMCID:
PMC5477675
DOI:
10.1016/j.tics.2017.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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