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Mayo Clin Proc. 2017 Apr;92(4):544-554. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2017.02.014.

Enabling Task-Specific Volitional Motor Functions via Spinal Cord Neuromodulation in a Human With Paraplegia.

Author information

1
Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
2
Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of California Los Angeles.
3
Rehabilitation Medicine Research Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
4
Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
5
Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of California Los Angeles; Pavlov Institute of Physiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia.
6
Rehabilitation Medicine Research Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: zhao.kristin@mayo.edu.
7
Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Rehabilitation Medicine Research Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: lee.kendall@mayo.edu.

Abstract

We report a case of chronic traumatic paraplegia in which epidural electrical stimulation (EES) of the lumbosacral spinal cord enabled (1) volitional control of task-specific muscle activity, (2) volitional control of rhythmic muscle activity to produce steplike movements while side-lying, (3) independent standing, and (4) while in a vertical position with body weight partially supported, voluntary control of steplike movements and rhythmic muscle activity. This is the first time that the application of EES enabled all of these tasks in the same patient within the first 2 weeks (8 stimulation sessions total) of EES therapy.

PMID:
28385196
DOI:
10.1016/j.mayocp.2017.02.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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