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Nat Commun. 2017 Apr 6;8:15039. doi: 10.1038/ncomms15039.

Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons coordinate hippocampal network dynamics required for memory consolidation.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
2
Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
3
Biophysics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
4
Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

Abstract

Activity in hippocampal area CA1 is essential for consolidating episodic memories, but it is unclear how CA1 activity patterns drive memory formation. We find that in the hours following single-trial contextual fear conditioning (CFC), fast-spiking interneurons (which typically express parvalbumin (PV)) show greater firing coherence with CA1 network oscillations. Post-CFC inhibition of PV+ interneurons blocks fear memory consolidation. This effect is associated with loss of two network changes associated with normal consolidation: (1) augmented sleep-associated delta (0.5-4 Hz), theta (4-12 Hz) and ripple (150-250 Hz) oscillations; and (2) stabilization of CA1 neurons' functional connectivity patterns. Rhythmic activation of PV+ interneurons increases CA1 network coherence and leads to a sustained increase in the strength and stability of functional connections between neurons. Our results suggest that immediately following learning, PV+ interneurons drive CA1 oscillations and reactivation of CA1 ensembles, which directly promotes network plasticity and long-term memory formation.

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