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Curr Neuropharmacol. 2017 Apr 6. doi: 10.2174/1570159X15666170406142631. [Epub ahead of print]

The Role of Autophagy in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang. China.
2
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA. United States.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA. United States.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, NO.88 Jiefang Rd, 310009, Hangzhou. China.

Abstract

Autophagy is an extensive self-degradation process for the disposition of cytosolic aggregated or misfolded proteins and defective organelles. Due to different cytosolic components, autophagy pathway executes the functions of pro-survival and pro-death to maintain cellular homeostasis. The pathway plays essential roles in several neurological disorders. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating subtype of hemorrhagic stroke with high risk of neurological deficit and high mortality. Early brain injury (EBI) plays a role in the poor clinical course and outcome after SAH. Recent studies have paid attention on the role of the autophagy pathway in the development of EBI after SAH. In this review, we elaborate on the molecular mechanisms of autophagy pathway and give an overview of the multifaceted roles of autophagy pathway in the pathogenesis of SAH, especially in the phase of EBI. The interaction between organelle dysfunction and autophagy pathway in the pathogenesis of EBI after SAH was also reviewed. In conclusion, autophagy plays an important role in the SAH-induced brain injury, which might be a potent therapeutic target.

KEYWORDS:

autophagy; early brain injury; pathogenesis; subarachnoid hemorrhage; subcellular organelles; treatment

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