Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Transl Med. 2017 Apr 5;9(384). pii: eaai8711. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aai8711.

Therapeutic treatment of Marburg and Ravn virus infection in nonhuman primates with a human monoclonal antibody.

Author information

1
Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.
3
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
4
Department of Applied Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, 1190 Vienna, Austria.
5
Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., San Diego, CA 92121, USA.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
7
Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
8
Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., San Diego, CA 92121, USA. twgeisbe@utmb.edu larry.zeitlin@mappbio.com.
9
Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. twgeisbe@utmb.edu larry.zeitlin@mappbio.com.

Abstract

As observed during the 2013-2016 Ebola virus disease epidemic, containment of filovirus outbreaks is challenging and made more difficult by the lack of approved vaccine or therapeutic options. Marburg and Ravn viruses are highly virulent and cause severe and frequently lethal disease in humans. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a platform technology in wide use for autoimmune and oncology indications. Previously, we described human mAbs that can protect mice from lethal challenge with Marburg virus. We demonstrate that one of these mAbs, MR191-N, can confer a survival benefit of up to 100% to Marburg or Ravn virus-infected rhesus macaques when treatment is initiated up to 5 days post-inoculation. These findings extend the small but growing body of evidence that mAbs can impart therapeutic benefit during advanced stages of disease with highly virulent viruses and could be useful in epidemic settings.

PMID:
28381540
PMCID:
PMC5719873
DOI:
10.1126/scitranslmed.aai8711
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center