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Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 May;105(5):1204-1213. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.145680. Epub 2017 Apr 5.

Can genetic-based advice help you lose weight? Findings from the Food4Me European randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Human Nutrition Research Center, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
2
Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Center, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Human Biology, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, Netherlands.
4
Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Center for Nutrition Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
5
Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition and Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom.
6
University College Dublin (UCD) Institute of Food and Health, UCD, Dublin, Ireland.
7
Research Center of Nutrition and Food Sciences (ZIEL), Biochemistry Unit, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
8
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
9
National Food and Nutrition Institute, Warsaw, Poland.
10
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
11
Eurogenetica Ltd, Burnham-on-Sea, United Kingdom; and.
12
Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Microbiology and Systems Biology Group, Zeist, Netherlands.
13
Human Nutrition Research Center, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom; john.mathers@ncl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Background: There has been limited evidence about whether genotype-tailored advice provides extra benefits in reducing obesity-related traits compared with the benefits of conventional one-size-fits-all advice.Objective: We determined whether the disclosure of information on fat-mass and obesity-associated (FTO) genotype risk had a greater effect on a reduction of obesity-related traits in risk carriers than in nonrisk carriers across different levels of personalized nutrition.Design: A total of 683 participants (women: 51%; age range: 18-73 y) from the Food4Me randomized controlled trial were included in this analysis. Participants were randomly assigned to 4 intervention arms as follows: level 0, control group; level 1, dietary group; level 2, phenotype group; and level 3, genetic group. FTO (single nucleotide polymorphism rs9939609) was genotyped at baseline in all participants, but only subjects who were randomly assigned to level 3 were informed about their genotypes. Level 3 participants were stratified into risk carriers (AA/AT) and nonrisk carriers (TT) of the FTO gene for analyses. Height, weight, and waist circumference (WC) were self-measured and reported at baseline and months 3 and 6.Results: Changes in adiposity markers were greater in participants who were informed that they carried the FTO risk allele (level 3 AT/AA carriers) than in the nonpersonalized group (level 0) but not in the other personalized groups (level 1 and 2). Mean reductions in weight and WC at month 6 were greater for FTO risk carriers than for noncarriers in the level 3 group [-2.28 kg (95% CI: -3.06, -1.48 kg) compared with -1.99 kg (-2.19, -0.19 kg), respectively (P = 0.037); and -4.34 cm (-5.63, -3.08 cm) compared with -1.99 cm (-4.04, -0.05 cm), respectively, (P = 0.048)].Conclusions: There are greater body weight and WC reductions in risk carriers than in nonrisk carriers of the FTO gene. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01530139.

KEYWORDS:

FTO; genotype; personalized nutrition; randomized controlled trial; weight

PMID:
28381478
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.116.145680
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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