Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2018 Mar 2;73(3):413-420. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbx020.

Association of Anxiety Symptom Clusters with Sleep Quality and Daytime Sleepiness.

Author information

1
Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, California.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California.
3
Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
5
Pacific Graduate School of Psychology, Palo Alto University, California.
6
Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Centers (MIRECC), Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, California.

Abstract

Objectives:

To better understand links between anxiety and sleep disturbances in older adults, we examined the association of different phenotypic presentations of anxiety (i.e., affective, cognitive, and somatic clusters) with global sleep quality and daytime sleepiness.

Methods:

109 community-dwelling adults aged 66-92 years old (57% female) completed assessments of global sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), affective anxiety symptoms (Geriatric Anxiety Scale (GAS) affective subscale), cognitive anxiety symptoms (GAS cognitive subscale), and somatic anxiety symptoms (GAS somatic subscale).

Results:

In hierarchical regression models adjusted for depressive symptoms and health status, greater affective and somatic anxiety were associated with poorer global sleep quality (affective B = 0.30, p = .01; somatic B = 0.41, p = .01). Somatic and cognitive anxiety were associated with greater daytime sleepiness (somatic B = 0.74, p < .001; cognitive B = 0.30, p = .03), but these associations were attenuated by covariates added to the models.

Discussion:

These findings indicate that anxiety symptom clusters are differentially associated with specific sleep-related disturbances, underscoring the complex relationship of late-life anxiety to sleep. Results suggest that personalized treatments, such as targeted sleep interventions, may improve specific anxiety-symptom domains, or vice versa.

PMID:
28379498
PMCID:
PMC6074813
DOI:
10.1093/geronb/gbx020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center