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J Sleep Res. 2017 Oct;26(5):602-605. doi: 10.1111/jsr.12529. Epub 2017 Apr 4.

Short-interval leg movements during sleep entail greater cardiac activation than periodic leg movements during sleep in restless legs syndrome patients.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, IRCCS Oasi, Troina, Italy.
2
Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
3
Department of Neurology, San Raffaele Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy.
4
Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.
5
Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Civic Hospital (EOC) of Lugano and Neurology Department Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland.

Abstract

Periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS) are sequences of ≥4 motor events with intermovement intervals (IMI) of 10-90 s. PLMS are a supportive diagnostic criterion for restless legs syndrome (RLS) and entail cardiac activation, particularly when associated with arousal. RLS patients also over-express short-interval leg movements during sleep (SILMS), which have IMI <10 s and are organized mainly in sequences of two movements (doublets). We tested whether the cardiac activation associated with SILMS doublets differs from that associated with PLMS in a sample of 25 RLS patients. We analysed time-series of R-R intervals synchronized to the onset of SILMS doublets or PLMS that entailed an arousal during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. We assessed cardiac activation based on the R-R interval decrease with respect to baseline during NREM sleep without leg movements. We found that the duration of the R-R interval decrease with SILMS doublets was significantly longer than that with PLMS, whereas the maximal decrease in R-R interval was similar. Scoring SILMS in RLS patients may therefore be relevant from a cardiac autonomic perspective.

KEYWORDS:

Willis-Ekbom disease; autonomic control; heart rate

PMID:
28378384
DOI:
10.1111/jsr.12529
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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