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Arch Toxicol. 2017 Aug;91(8):2723-2743. doi: 10.1007/s00204-017-1962-5. Epub 2017 Apr 3.

Glyphosate toxicity and carcinogenicity: a review of the scientific basis of the European Union assessment and its differences with IARC.

Author information

1
Pesticides Unit, European Food Safety Authority, Via Carlo Magno 1/A, 43126, Parma, Italy. Jose.Tarazona@efsa.europa.eu.
2
Pesticides Unit, European Food Safety Authority, Via Carlo Magno 1/A, 43126, Parma, Italy.
3
Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide worldwide. It is a broad spectrum herbicide and its agricultural uses increased considerably after the development of glyphosate-resistant genetically modified (GM) varieties. Since glyphosate was introduced in 1974, all regulatory assessments have established that glyphosate has low hazard potential to mammals, however, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) concluded in March 2015 that it is probably carcinogenic. The IARC conclusion was not confirmed by the EU assessment or the recent joint WHO/FAO evaluation, both using additional evidence. Glyphosate is not the first topic of disagreement between IARC and regulatory evaluations, but has received greater attention. This review presents the scientific basis of the glyphosate health assessment conducted within the European Union (EU) renewal process, and explains the differences in the carcinogenicity assessment with IARC. Use of different data sets, particularly on long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity in rodents, could partially explain the divergent views; but methodological differences in the evaluation of the available evidence have been identified. The EU assessment did not identify a carcinogenicity hazard, revised the toxicological profile proposing new toxicological reference values, and conducted a risk assessment for some representatives uses. Two complementary exposure assessments, human-biomonitoring and food-residues-monitoring, suggests that actual exposure levels are below these reference values and do not represent a public concern.

KEYWORDS:

Carcinogenicity; Consumer risk; EFSA; Glyphosate; IARC; Public health; Toxicity

PMID:
28374158
PMCID:
PMC5515989
DOI:
10.1007/s00204-017-1962-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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