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Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2017 Jun;135(6):554-563. doi: 10.1111/acps.12726. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

Impact of childhood trauma on course of panic disorder: contribution of clinical and personality characteristics.

Author information

1
University Department of Psychiatry, Campus University Hospital Antwerp (UZA), Antwerp, Belgium.
2
Collaborative Antwerp Psychiatric Research Institute (CAPRI), Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp (UA), Antwerp, Belgium.
3
Department of Scientific Coordination and Biostatistics, University Hospital Antwerp (UZA), Antwerp, Belgium.
4
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Neuroscience and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
6
University Department of Psychiatry, Campus Psychiatric Hospital Duffel, Duffel, Belgium.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the impact of childhood trauma on the clinical course of panic disorder and possible contributing factors.

METHOD:

Longitudinal data of 539 participants with a current panic disorder were collected from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Childhood trauma was assessed with a structured interview and clinical course after 2 years with a DSM-IV-based diagnostic interview and the Life Chart Interview.

RESULTS:

At baseline, 54.5% reported childhood trauma, but this was not predictive of persistence of panic disorder. Emotional neglect and psychological abuse were associated with higher occurrence of anxiety disorders other than panic disorder (social phobia) and with higher chronicity of general anxiety symptoms (anxiety attacks or episodes and avoidance). Baseline clinical features (duration and severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms) and personality traits (neuroticism and extraversion) accounted for roughly 30-60% of the total effect of childhood trauma on chronicity of anxiety symptoms and on occurrence of other anxiety disorders.

CONCLUSION:

After two years, childhood trauma is associated with chronicity of anxiety symptoms and occurrence of social phobia, rather than persistence of panic disorder. These relationships are partially accounted for by duration and severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms, and neuroticism and extraversion.

KEYWORDS:

anxiety disorder; childhood trauma; course; longitudinal; panic disorder

PMID:
28369890
DOI:
10.1111/acps.12726
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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