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Int J Cancer. 2017 Jul 1;141(1):143-151. doi: 10.1002/ijc.30712. Epub 2017 Apr 19.

Role of mucosal high-risk human papillomavirus types in head and neck cancers in central India.

Author information

1
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, 69008, France.
2
Cancer Research Program, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, 695014, India.
3
Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain & CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO)-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, 695014, India.
6
Roche MTM laboratories, Mannheim, Germany.
7
Ventana Medical Systems Inc, Tucson, AZ.
8
University of Antwerp, Antwerp, 2020, Belgium.
9
European Institute of Oncology, Milan I-20141, Italy.
10
Hospital del Mar, Parc de Salut Mar, Pg/Marítim 25-29, Barcelona, 08003, Spain.
11
Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, Karnataka, 560029, India.
12
Regional Cancer Centre, Thiruvananthapuram, 695011, India.
13
Unit of Cancer Epidemiology/Belgian Cancer Centre, Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels, B1050, Belgium.
14
Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram, Wardha, Maharashtra State, 442102, India.

Abstract

Mucosal high-risk (HR) human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause a subset of head and neck cancers (HNC). The HPV-attributable fraction of HNC varies substantially between countries. Although HNC has a very high incidence in the Indian subcontinent, information on the contribution of HPV infection is limited. Here, we evaluated the HPV-attributable fraction in HNC (N = 364) collected in a central region of India. HNC from three different anatomical subsites were included, namely, oral cavity (n = 252), oropharynx (n = 53) and hypopharynx/larynx (n = 59). In this retrospective study, HPV-driven HNC were defined by presence of both viral DNA and RNA. Overexpression of p16INK4a was also evaluated. HR-HPV DNA was detected in 13.7% of the cases; however, only 2.7% were positive for both HPV DNA and RNA. The highest percentage of HPV DNA/RNA double positivity was found in oropharynx (9.4%), followed by larynx (1.7%) and oral cavity (1.6%) (p = 0.02). More than half of HPV DNA/RNA-positive cases were p16INK4a -negative, while a considerable number of HPV RNA-negative cases were p16INK4a -positive (17.9%). HPV16 was the major type associated with HNC (60.0%), although cases positive for HPV18, 35 and 56 were also detected. Our data indicate that the proportion and types of mucosal HR-HPV associated with HNC in this central Indian region differ from those in other (developed) parts of the world. This may be explained by differences in smoking and/or sexual behaviour compared with North America and northern Europe. Moreover, we show that p16INK4a staining appeared not to be a good surrogate marker of HPV transformation in the Indian HNC cases.

KEYWORDS:

HPV; central India; head and neck cancer

PMID:
28369859
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.30712
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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