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Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2017 May;135(5):439-447. doi: 10.1111/acps.12718. Epub 2017 Mar 29.

Positive symptoms associate with cortical thinning in the superior temporal gyrus via the ENIGMA Schizophrenia consortium.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
2
Division of Psychological and Social Medicine and Developmental Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
3
Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
4
Imaging Genetics Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Marina del Rey, CA, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, School of Medicine, University of Cantabria-IDIVAL, Santander, Spain.
7
Cibersam (Centro Investigación Biomédica en Red Salud Mental), Santander, Spain.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
9
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
10
Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
11
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
12
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
13
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
14
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
15
Molecular Research Center for Children's Mental Development, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan.
16
Department of Psychiatry, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan.
17
Division of Cerebral Integration, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi, Japan.
18
NESMOS Department (Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions), School of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.
19
Laboratory of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Clinical and Behavioural Neurology, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy.
20
Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
21
Museo storico della fisica e Centro studi e ricerche Enrico Fermi, Rome, Italy.
22
Beth K. and Stuart C. Yudofsky Division of Neuropsychiatry, Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
23
Brain Behavior Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
24
Section for Experimental Psychopathology and Neuroimaging, Department of General Psychiatry, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
25
Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
26
Centre for Neuroimaging & Cognitive Genomics (NICOG), Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, NCBES Galway Neuroscience Centre, College of Medicine Nursing and Health Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
27
Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, S.G. Rotondo (FG), Italy.
28
Psychiatric Neuroscience Group, University of Bari 'Aldo Moro', Bari, Italy.
29
Division of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, Morningside, Edinburgh, UK.
30
The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
31
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
32
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
33
Translational Developmental Neuroscience Section, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Based on the role of the superior temporal gyrus (STG) in auditory processing, language comprehension and self-monitoring, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between STG cortical thickness and positive symptom severity in schizophrenia.

METHOD:

This prospective meta-analysis includes data from 1987 individuals with schizophrenia collected at seventeen centres around the world that contribute to the ENIGMA Schizophrenia Working Group. STG thickness measures were extracted from T1-weighted brain scans using FreeSurfer. The study performed a meta-analysis of effect sizes across sites generated by a model predicting left or right STG thickness with a positive symptom severity score (harmonized SAPS or PANSS-positive scores), while controlling for age, sex and site. Secondary models investigated relationships between antipsychotic medication, duration of illness, overall illness severity, handedness and STG thickness.

RESULTS:

Positive symptom severity was negatively related to STG thickness in both hemispheres (left: βstd = -0.052; P = 0.021; right: βstd = -0.073; P = 0.001) when statistically controlling for age, sex and site. This effect remained stable in models including duration of illness, antipsychotic medication or handedness.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings further underline the important role of the STG in hallmark symptoms in schizophrenia. These findings can assist in advancing insight into symptom-relevant pathophysiological mechanisms in schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS:

ENIGMA; FreeSurfer; MRI; cortical thickness; positive and negative syndrome scale; positive symptoms; scale for the assessment of positive symptoms; schizophrenia; superior temporal gyrus

PMID:
28369804
PMCID:
PMC5399182
DOI:
10.1111/acps.12718
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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