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Environ Sci Technol. 2017 May 2;51(9):5279-5286. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.7b00701. Epub 2017 Apr 13.

Bisphenols, Benzophenones, and Bisphenol A Diglycidyl Ethers in Textiles and Infant Clothing.

Author information

1
Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany , Empire State Plaza, P.O. Box 509, Albany, New York 12201-0509, United States.
2
Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085, China.
3
Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Science and Experimental Biochemistry Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University , Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Little is known with regard to the occurrence of potentially toxic chemicals in textiles and clothes. In this study, 77 textiles and infant clothing pieces were analyzed for the determination of bisphenols including bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol S (BPS), benzophenones, bisphenol A diglycidyl ethers (BADGEs), and novolac glycidyl ethers (NOGEs). BPA and BPS occurred in 82% and 53% of the textile samples, respectively, and at mean concentrations of 366 and 15 ng/g, respectively. Benzophenone-3 (BP3) occurred in 70% of the samples at a mean concentration of 11.3 ng/g. Among 11 BADGEs and NOGEs analyzed, BFDGE was the predominant compound, with a mean concentration of 13.6 ng/g. Concentrations of target chemicals were assessed by fabric type, color, and uses. Socks contained the highest concentrations of BPA (mean: 1810 ng/g) with concentrations as high as 13 300 ng/g in a 97% polyester fabric marketed for infants. Calculated dermal exposure dose to BPA by infants via textiles was as high as 7280 pg/kg BW/d. This is the first study to report the occurrence of, and exposure to, BPA, BPS, BADGEs, and NOGEs in textiles and clothing.

PMID:
28368574
DOI:
10.1021/acs.est.7b00701
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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