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Neurosci Bull. 2018 Feb;34(1):156-164. doi: 10.1007/s12264-017-0125-2. Epub 2017 Apr 1.

Spinal Mechanisms of Itch Transmission.

Barry DM1,2, Munanairi A1,2, Chen ZF3,4,5,6.

Author information

1
Center for the Study of Itch, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
3
Center for the Study of Itch, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. chenz@wustl.edu.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. chenz@wustl.edu.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. chenz@wustl.edu.
6
Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. chenz@wustl.edu.

Abstract

Peripheral itch stimuli are transmitted by sensory neurons to the spinal cord dorsal horn, which then transmits the information to the brain. The molecular and cellular mechanisms within the dorsal horn for itch transmission have only been investigated and identified during the past ten years. This review covers the progress that has been made in identifying the peptide families in sensory neurons and the receptor families in dorsal horn neurons as putative itch transmitters, with a focus on gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP)-GRP receptor signaling. Also discussed are the signaling mechanisms, including opioids, by which various types of itch are transmitted and modulated, as well as the many conflicting results arising from recent studies.

KEYWORDS:

DRG; GPCR signaling; Itch; Neuropeptides; Spinal cord

PMID:
28365862
PMCID:
PMC5799115
[Available on 2019-02-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s12264-017-0125-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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