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Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2017 Jun;45:136-143. doi: 10.1016/j.copbio.2017.03.006. Epub 2017 Mar 31.

Metabolic engineering strategies to bio-adipic acid production.

Author information

1
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States; Renewable Bioproducts Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States.
2
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States; Renewable Bioproducts Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States; School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States. Electronic address: pperalta-yahya@chemistry.gatech.edu.

Abstract

Adipic acid is the most industrially important dicarboxylic acid as it is a key monomer in the synthesis of nylon. Today, adipic acid is obtained via a chemical process that relies on petrochemical precursors and releases large quantities of greenhouse gases. In the last two years, significant progress has been made in engineering microbes for the production of adipic acid and its immediate precursors, muconic acid and glucaric acid. Not only have the microbial substrates expanded beyond glucose and glycerol to include lignin monomers and hemicellulose components, but the number of microbial chassis now goes further than Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to include microbes proficient in aromatic degradation, cellulose secretion and degradation of multiple carbon sources. Here, we review the metabolic engineering and nascent protein engineering strategies undertaken in each of these chassis to convert different feedstocks to adipic, muconic and glucaric acid. We also highlight near term prospects and challenges for each of the metabolic routes discussed.

PMID:
28365404
DOI:
10.1016/j.copbio.2017.03.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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