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Sleep. 2017 Jan 1;40(1). doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsw004.

Association Between Short Sleep Duration and Risk Behavior Factors in Middle School Students.

Owens J1,2, Wang G2,3,4, Lewin D2, Skora E2,5, Baylor A2,6.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
2
Department of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC.
3
Department of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Pediatric Translational Medicine Institute, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai, China.
4
School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.
5
School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
6
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.

Abstract

Study Objectives:

To examine the association between self-reported sleep duration (SD) and peer/individual factors predictive of risky behaviors (risk behavior factors) in a large socioeconomically diverse school-based sample of early adolescents.

Design, Setting, and Participants:

Survey data collected from 10718 and 11240 eighth-grade students in 2010 and 2012, respectively, were analyzed.

Intervention:

N/A.

Measurements and Results:

Self-reported school night SD was grouped as ≤4 hours, 5 hours, 6 hours, 7 hours, 8 hours, 9 hours, and ≥10 hours. Scores on 10 peer/individual risk behavior factor scales were dichotomized according to national eigth-grade cut points. The percentage of students reporting an "optimal" SD of 9 hours was 14.8% and 15.6% in 2010 and 2012, respectively; 45.6% and 46.1% reported <7 hours. Adjusted for covariates of gender, race, and SES, multilevel logistic regression results showed that odds ratios (ORs) for 9 of 10 risk factor scales increased with SD <7 hours, with a dose-response effect for each hour less sleep compared to an SD of 9 hours. For example, ORs for students sleeping <7 hours ranged from 1.3 (early initiation of antisocial behavior) to 1.8 (early initiation of drug use). The risk factor scale ORs for <5 hours SD ranged from 3.0 (sensation seeking) to 6.4 (gang involvement).

Conclusions:

Middle school students are at high risk of insufficient sleep; in particular, an SD <7 hours is associated with increased risk behavior factors.

KEYWORDS:

adolescent sleep; risk behavior.; sleep duration

PMID:
28364447
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/zsw004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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