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J Adolesc Health. 2017 Jul;61(1):61-69. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.01.023. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

Engagement With Online Tobacco Marketing and Associations With Tobacco Product Use Among U.S. Youth.

Author information

1
Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire. Electronic address: samir.soneji@dartmouth.edu.
2
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.
3
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, Bethesda, Maryland.
4
Center for Tobacco Products, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland.
5
Westat, Rockville, Maryland; Department of Oncology, Cancer Prevention & Control Program, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.
6
Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
7
Westat, Rockville, Maryland.
8
Westat, Rockville, Maryland; Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
9
Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Youth who engage with online tobacco marketing may be more susceptible to tobacco use than unengaged youth. This study examines online engagement with tobacco marketing and its association with tobacco use patterns.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis of youths aged 12-17 years who participated in wave 1 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study (N = 13,651). Engagement with tobacco marketing was based on 10 survey items including signing up for email alerts about tobacco products in the past 6 months. Logistic regression was used to examine the association of online engagement with tobacco marketing and susceptibility to use any tobacco product among never-tobacco users, ever having tried tobacco, and past 30-day tobacco use.

RESULTS:

An estimated 2.94 million U.S. youth (12%) engaged with ≥ one forms of online tobacco marketing. Compared with no engagement, the odds of susceptibility to the use of any tobacco product among never-tobacco users was independently associated with the level of online engagement: adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.48 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.76) for one form of engagement and AOR = 2.37 (95% CI, 1.53-3.68) for ≥ two forms of engagement. The odds of ever having tried tobacco were also independently associated with the level of online engagement: AOR = 1.33 (95% CI: 1.11-1.60) for one form of engagement and AOR = 1.54 (95% CI, 1.16-2.03) for ≥ two forms of engagement. The level of online engagement was not independently associated with past 30-day tobacco use.

CONCLUSIONS:

Online engagement with tobacco marketing may represent an important risk factor for the onset of tobacco use in youth.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Cigarette smoking; Engagement with online tobacco marketing

PMID:
28363720
PMCID:
PMC5483203
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.01.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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