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J Adolesc Health. 2017 Jul;61(1):107-114. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.01.018. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

Prevalence of Metabolically Healthy but Overweight/Obese Phenotype and Its Association With Sedentary Time, Physical Activity, and Fitness.

Author information

1
Faculty of Sport Sciences, Department of Physical Education and Sports, PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health through physical activity" research group, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Electronic address: cadenas@ugr.es.
2
Faculty of Sport Sciences, Department of Physical Education and Sports, PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health through physical activity" research group, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
3
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Vitoria, Spain.
4
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; International Agency for Research on Cancer, Nutrition and Metabolism Section, Lyon, France.
5
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
6
ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences-INEF, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; CIBER: CB12/03/30038 Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain.
7
ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences-INEF, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Universität Bonn, Institut für Ernährungs- und Lebensmittelwissenschaften Ernährungsphysiologie, Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms, Bonn, Germany.
8
University of Crete School of Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine & Nutrition Unit, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
9
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
10
Univ. Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, UMR995 - LIRIC - Lille Inflammation Research International Center, F-59000 Lille, France & Univ. Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, CIC 1403 - Centre d'investigation clinique, F-59000 Lille, France.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.
12
Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Centre, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
13
CIBER: CB12/03/30038 Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain; Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
14
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Rome, Italy.
15
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
16
Department of Medical Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Childhood obesity is one of the major concerns in the last years due to the association with future health problems and all-cause mortality. However, there is a subset of adolescents with overweight/obesity who present a metabolic healthy profile. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of metabolically healthy but overweight/obese adolescents and whether sedentary time, physical activity, and fitness differ between metabolically healthy and nonmetabolically healthy phenotypes.

METHODS:

A subsample of 237 European adolescents from the HEalthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study (n = 3,528, participation rate: 61.3%) with overweight/obesity were included. The study sample was not fully representative for the European adolescent population. Based on sex- and age-specific metabolic syndrome cutoff points for triglycerides, glucose, blood pressure, and high-density cholesterol participants were classified as metabolically healthy or nonmetabolically healthy. Sedentary time, physical activity, and fitness were assessed by accelerometry and the Alpha battery, respectively.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of metabolically healthy status in adolescents with overweight and obesity was higher in girls (87%) than in boys (74%, p = .019), being similar when only obesity was considered. Sedentary time was lower in metabolically healthy overweight/obese than in nonmetabolically healthy participants (mean difference = 48.0 minutes, p = .012). Moderate and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were higher (p's < .05) in metabolically healthy than in nonmetabolically healthy adolescents with overweight/obesity (mean difference = 7.9 min/day and 10.9 min/day, respectively). No significant differences were found in fitness. Overall, these results persisted when only adolescents with obesity were included in the analyses.

CONCLUSIONS:

Metabolically healthy adolescents with overweight/obesity are less sedentary and more active than their nonmetabolically healthy peers with overweight/obesity, yet consistent differences in fitness were not observed.

KEYWORDS:

Children; MHO; Metabolic status; Nonmetabolically healthy; Youth; non-MHO

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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