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J Endocrinol. 2017 Jun;233(3):R109-R129. doi: 10.1530/JOE-17-0023. Epub 2017 Mar 29.

Exposure to endocrine disruptors during adulthood: consequences for female fertility.

Author information

1
Department of Comparative BiosciencesUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA.
2
Department of Comparative BiosciencesUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA jflaws@illinois.edu.

Abstract

Endocrine disrupting chemicals are ubiquitous chemicals that exhibit endocrine disrupting properties in both humans and animals. Female reproduction is an important process, which is regulated by hormones and is susceptible to the effects of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals. Disruptions in female reproductive functions by endocrine disrupting chemicals may result in subfertility, infertility, improper hormone production, estrous and menstrual cycle abnormalities, anovulation, and early reproductive senescence. This review summarizes the effects of a variety of synthetic endocrine disrupting chemicals on fertility during adult life. The chemicals covered in this review are pesticides (organochlorines, organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, and triazines), heavy metals (arsenic, lead, and mercury), diethylstilbesterol, plasticizer alternatives (di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and bisphenol A alternatives), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, nonylphenol, polychlorinated biphenyls, triclosan, and parabens. This review focuses on the hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, and uterus because together they regulate normal female fertility and the onset of reproductive senescence. The literature shows that several endocrine disrupting chemicals have endocrine disrupting abilities in females during adult life, causing fertility abnormalities in both humans and animals.

KEYWORDS:

adult; endocrine disrupting chemicals; female; fertility

PMID:
28356401
PMCID:
PMC5479690
DOI:
10.1530/JOE-17-0023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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