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Sci Rep. 2017 Mar 28;7(1):480. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-00509-w.

Anodal tDCS over the primary motor cortex improves motor imagery benefits on postural control: A pilot study.

Author information

1
Univ Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité (EA 7424, LIBM), F-69622, Villeurbanne, France.
2
Universidad de Alcalá, Unidad de Fisioterapia. Campus Universitario, Ctra. Madrid Barcelona, 28801, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.
3
Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Departamento Automática e Informática, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, 28040, Madrid, Spain.
4
Université Laval, École de Psychologie, Ville de Québec, Québec, Canada.
5
Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche en Réadaptation et Intégration Sociale, Québec, Canada.
6
Univ Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité (EA 7424, LIBM), F-69622, Villeurbanne, France. aymeric.guillot@univ-lyon1.fr.
7
Institut Universitaire de France, Paris, France. aymeric.guillot@univ-lyon1.fr.

Abstract

Performing everyday actions requires fine postural control, which is a major focus of functional rehabilitation programs. Among the various range of training methods likely to improve balance and postural stability, motor imagery practice (MIP) yielded promising results. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over the primary motor cortex was also found to potentiate the benefits of MIP on upper-limb motor tasks. Yet, combining both techniques has not been tested for tasks requiring fine postural control. To determine the impact of MIP and the additional effects of tDCS, 14 participants performed a postural control task before and after two experimental (MIP + anodal or sham tDCS over the primary motor cortex) and one control (control task + sham tDCS) conditions, in a double blind randomized study. Data revealed a significant decrease of the time required to perform the postural task. Greater performance gains were recorded when MIP was paired with anodal tDCS and when the task involved the most complex postural adjustments. Altogether, findings highlight short-term effects of MIP on postural control and suggest that combining MIP with tDCS might also be effective in rehabilitation programs for regaining postural skills in easily fatigable persons and neurologic populations.

PMID:
28352100
PMCID:
PMC5428691
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-00509-w
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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